Analysis

UN takes lead in promoting ethical tourism (Sept 2011)

Sep 2011

by Ekobai Contributor, Responsible Tourism Industry

In September 2011 the United Nations held its first International Congress on Ethics and Tourism. The event brought together more than 450 high-profile tourism officials, business leaders, international organisations and experts in Madrid, Spain, to discuss how to guarantee sustainable tourism as well as its role in poverty reduction, gender equality, and fighting exploitation in both the public and private sectors.

As part of the event, 14 prominent Spanish tourism businesses have signed up to follow the Global Code of Ethics for Tourism, a set of principles backed by the UN World Tourism Organization (UNWTO). The Code is designed to guide the development of tourism in a way that maximizes the socio-economic benefits of the sector, while minimizing any negative impacts.  While the ten-point Code was adopted in 1999 by the UNWTO General Assembly and endorsed by the United Nations General Assembly in 2001, the additional pledge from high-profile tourism leaders in Spain this month should encourage others in the tourism industry to follow suit.
http://ethics.unwto.org/en/content/global-code-ethics-tourism
The majority of the companies in attendance at the Congress also signed the Code of Conduct for the Protection of Children from Sexual Exploitation in Travel and Tourism, committing themselves to concrete measures to protect children. The code was founded by ECPAT International, a global network for the elimination of child prostitution, child pornography and child trafficking for sexual purposes, and is funded by the United Nations Children Fund (UNICEF) http://www.unicef.org/ and supported by UNWTO.
Meanwhile in South Africa, the Minister of Tourism, Marthinus van Schalkwyk, has just launched the South African National Minimum Standards for Responsible Tourism (NMSRT), which aims to promote sustainability and responsible tourism in the tourism sector, while reducing undesirable impact.
The standard will be used by tourism organisations to create awareness of responsible tourism among their members. It can also be used by tourism businesses and organisations preparing for certification or simply evaluating their organisations' progress in respect of sustainability.
We may well see a range of similar initiatives come on stream in the coming years as the issue of sustainable, responsible tourism continues to gain a higher media profile.
Check out Ekobai’s list of the main standards relevant to the tourism, hospitality and events industries. http://www.ekobai.com/analysis/details/7/hospitality-and-events

In September 2011 the United Nations held its first International Congress on Ethics and Tourism. The event brought together more than 450 high-profile tourism officials, business leaders, international organisations and experts in Madrid, Spain, to discuss how to guarantee sustainable tourism as well as its role in poverty reduction, gender equality, and fighting exploitation in both the public and private sectors.

As part of the event, 14 prominent Spanish tourism businesses have signed up to follow the Global Code of Ethics for Tourism, a set of principles backed by the UN World Tourism Organization (UNWTO). The Code is designed to guide the development of tourism in a way that maximizes the socio-economic benefits of the sector, while minimizing any negative impacts.  While the ten-point Code was adopted in 1999 by the UNWTO General Assembly and endorsed by the United Nations General Assembly in 2001, the additional pledge from high-profile tourism leaders in Spain this month should encourage others in the tourism industry to follow suit.

The majority of the companies in attendance at the Congress also signed the Code of Conduct for the Protection of Children from Sexual Exploitation in Travel and Tourism, committing themselves to concrete measures to protect children. The code was founded by ECPAT International, a global network for the elimination of child prostitution, child pornography and child trafficking for sexual purposes, and is funded by the United Nations Children Fund (UNICEF) and supported by UNWTO.

Meanwhile in South Africa, the Minister of Tourism, Marthinus van Schalkwyk, has just launched the South African National Minimum Standards for Responsible Tourism (NMSRT), which aims to promote sustainability and responsible tourism in the tourism sector, while reducing undesirable impact.

The standard will be used by tourism organisations to create awareness of responsible tourism among their members. It can also be used by tourism businesses and organisations preparing for certification or simply evaluating their organisations' progress in respect of sustainability.

We may well see a range of similar region and international initiatives come on stream in the coming months as the issue of sustainable, responsible tourism continues to gain a higher media profile. 

Check out Ekobai’s list of the main standards relevant to the responsible tourism, hospitality and events industries

 

Popular Searches

Ekobai.com is a supplier directory listing over 50,000 companies from around the world producing and selling products certified to sustainability and organic standards such as Fair Trade, FSC, MSC and the Soil Association mark.  Our B2B directory is free for companies to list on and the information is open to all viewers at no charge.  Companies listed on ekobai.com find new customers from around the world and buyers can short list and contact new suppliers based on ethical and sustainability criteria.

ekobai.com messaging